Fund Sources

Local Funding Programs

Measure B: In 2000, nearly 82 percent of Alameda County voters approved Measure B, the half-cent transportation sales tax. Alameda CTC administers Measure B funds to deliver essential transportation improvements and services. The Alameda County 20-year Transportation Expenditure Plan guides the expenditures of more than $1.4 billion in county transportation funds generated through the continuation of the sales tax over the next 20 years.

Measure BB: In November 2014, over 71 percent of voters approved Measure BB, authorizing an extension of the existing transportation sales tax (Measure B). The 2014 Transportation Expenditure Plan (2014 TEP) guides the investments of Measure BB revenues toward capital projects and programs that improve the countywide transportation system.

Vehicle Registration Fee: In November 2010, 63 percent of voters approved a vehicle registration fee to fund transportation programs, link to program expenditure plan.

In 2000, nearly 82 percent of Alameda County voters approved Measure B, the half-cent transportation sales tax. Alameda CTC administers Measure B funds to deliver essential transportation improvements and services. The Alameda County 20-year Transportation Expenditure Plan guides the expenditures of more than $1.4 billion in county transportation funds generated through the continuation of the sales tax over the next 20 years. The expenditure plan was developed to serve major regional transportation needs in Alameda County and to address congestion in every major commute corridor in the county.

Regional priorities are to:

  • Expand mass transit.
  • Improve highway infrastructure.
  • Improve local streets and roads.
  • Improve bicycle and pedestrian safety.
  • Expand special transportation for seniors and people with disabilities.

Local transit agencies and jurisdictions receive Measure B direct local distributions to meet these regional priorities through five main transportation programs (see the related content). Measure B also funds grant programs:

IMPLEMENTATION GUIDELINES

Implementation guidelines have been developed to specify the requirements that local jurisdictions must follow in their use of Measure B direct local distribution funds and Measure B and Vehicle Registration Fees (VRF) discretionary funds as authorized under Alameda County Transportation Commission Master Program Funding Agreements.

The intent of the implementation guidelines is to:

  1. Provide guidance on Bicycle and Pedestrian Safety funds eligible uses and expenditures.
  2. Define the terms in the Master Program Funding Agreements.
  3. Guide Bicycle and Pedestrian Program implementation.

The implementation guidelines for each program is outlined in the documents below:

CALL FOR PROJECTS

See here for current calls for projects.

Direct Local Distributions

Alameda CTC manages the following three local fund sources and makes monthly direct local distribution payments to local jurisdictions and transit agencies for transportation improvements. Learn more here.

Check out DLD compliance here.

In 2014, Alameda County voters approved Measure BB, authorizing an extension and augmentation of the existing transportation sale tax (Measure B). Measure BB is projected to generate approximately $8 billion in revenues from April 2015 to March 2045 for transportation improvements for Alameda County.

The 2014 Transportation Expenditure Plan (2014 TEP) guides the investments of Measure BB revenues toward capital projects and programs that improve the countywide transportation system. Priorities are to:

  • Expand BART, bus, ferry and rail services.
  • Keep fares affordable for youth, seniors and people with disabilities.
  • Provide traffic relief by improving local streets and roads and highway corridors.
  • Improve air quality and provide clean transportation by expanding bicycle and pedestrian paths and the regional rail network.
  • Create good jobs within Alameda County by requiring local contracting and supporting community developments that improve access to jobs and schools.

As part of the 2014 TEP, local agencies and transit jurisdictions receive Measure BB direct local distributions to support these transportation investments. The direct local distributions amount to approximately $70 million annually and are prioritized for use locally by the recipient.

The 2014 TEP also designates funding for the following programs:

  • Affordable Student Transit Pass Program
  • Bicycle and Pedestrian Program
  • Community Development Investments Program
  • Coordination and Service Grants (Paratransit Program)
  • Freight and Economic Development Program
  • Technology, Innovation and Development Program
  • Transit Innovative Grant Program (including student transportation programs)

Direct Local Distributions

Alameda CTC manages the following three local fund sources and makes monthly direct local distribution payments to local jurisdictions and transit agencies for transportation improvements. Learn more here.

Check out DLD compliance here.

The Measure F Alameda County Vehicle Registration Fee (VRF) Program was approved by the voters in November 2010, with 63 percent of the vote. The fee will generate about $11 million per year by a $10 per year vehicle registration fee. The collection of the $10 per year vehicle registration fee started in May 2011.

The goal of the VRF program is to sustain the County’s transportation network and reduce traffic congestion and vehicle-related pollution. The program includes four categories of projects:

  • Local Road Improvement and Repair Program (60 percent)
  • Transit for Congestion Relief (25 percent)
  • Local Transportation Technology (10 percent)
  • Pedestrian and Bicyclist Access and Safety Program (5 percent)

Alameda CTC will distribute an equitable share of the funds among the four planning areas of the county. Geographic equity will be measured by a formula, weighted 50 percent by population of the planning area and 50 percent of registered vehicles of the planning area. See the program expenditure plan.

Vehicle Registration Fee Audited Financial Statements and Program Compliance Reports are available here.

Direct Local Distributions

Alameda CTC manages the following three local fund sources and makes monthly direct local distribution payments to local jurisdictions and transit agencies for transportation improvements. Learn more here.

Check out DLD compliance here.

Regional Funding Programs

The Transportation Fund for Clean Air (TFCA) County Program Manager (CPM) Fund is a local fund source of the Bay Area Air Quality Management District (Air District). As the TFCA County Program Manager for Alameda County, Alameda CTC is responsible for programming 40 percent of the $4 vehicle registration fee collected in Alameda County for this program.

In June 2018, voters in the nine county San Francisco Bay Area approved Regional Measure 3 (RM 3). The measure provides $4.45 billion in transportation funding, with an estimated $1 billion eligible for Alameda County projects. The measure includes a plan to build major roadway and public transit improvements funded by an increase in bridge tolls on all Bay Area toll bridges except the Golden Gate Bridge. With RM 3, the region’s state-owned toll bridges will increase by $1 beginning January 1, 2019, $1 in January 2022, and another $1 increase in January 2025. RM 3 will fund projects in Alameda County that support better goods movement and economic development, highway and express lanes improvements, major transit investments, active transportation projects to encourage bicycling and walking, and major corridors supporting multiple modes of transportation. For a list of Alameda CTC eligible projects, see this fact sheet. The entire RM3 list can be found here.

COUNTY PROGRAM MANAGER FUND

The Transportation Fund for Clean Air (TFCA) County Program Manager (CPM) Fund is a local fund source of the Bay Area Air Quality Management District (Air District). As the TFCA County Program Manager for Alameda County, Alameda CTC is responsible for programming 40 percent of the $4 vehicle registration fee collected in Alameda County for this program. Through the Alameda CTC’s TFCA distribution formula, further detailed in Alameda CTC’s TFCA Program Guidelines, 70 percent of annual funding is available to the cities and county, and 30 percent is available for transit-related projects. Approximately $1.8 million in TFCA funding is programmed annually. Starting with Fiscal Year 2017-18, the programming of TFCA funding is coordinated with the biennial development of the Alameda CTC’s Comprehensive Investment Plan (CIP). Off-cycle programming actions may occur when needed to ensure the programming of TFCA funds within the deadlines established by the Air District.

Only public agencies are eligible TFCA applicants. TFCA-eligible projects are to result in the reduction of motor vehicle emissions. In general, eligible projects are those that conform to the provisions of the Alameda CTC Comprehensive Investment Plan (CIP) and the TFCA Program Guidelines contained within.

Projects must also meet the requirement of achieving an emission reduction cost-effectiveness, on an individual project basis, equal to or less than $90,000 of TFCA funds per ton of total reactive organic gases (ROG), oxides of nitrogen (NOx), and weighted particulate matter 10 microns in diameter and smaller (PM10) emissions reduced ($TFCA/ton emissions reduced), unless a higher threshold has been established by the Air District.

TFCA project sponsors are required to comply with all program requirements including expenditure deadlines, data collection and submittal of annual and final project reports. Data collection requirements vary by project type (see the sample monitoring forms below).

REFERENCE MATERIAL

Staff contact: Jacki Taylor, 510.208.7413, jtaylor@alamedactc.org

TFCA Call for Projects 

See here for current calls for projects.

The Lifeline Transportation Program is a regional program developed by the Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC) that is intended to support projects that address mobility and accessibility needs in low-income communities throughout the region. The Lifeline Program supports community-based transportation projects that are developed through a collaborative and inclusive planning process, improve a range of transportation choices and address transportation gaps and/or barriers identified in Community-based Transportation Plans (CBTPs) or other substantive local planning efforts involving outreach to low-income populations. Alameda CTC administers the Lifeline Transportation Program within Alameda County.

Cycle 5 Call for Projects

On February 23, 2018, the Alameda County Transportation Commission (Alameda CTC) released a call for projects for the Cycle 5 Lifeline Transportation Program.

Applications are due electronically to Alameda CTC by 5 p.m. Friday, March 23, 2018. Late or incomplete applications will not be accepted.

MTC has funded Cycle 5 with a combination of Federal Transit Administration (FTA) Section 5307 and State Transit Assistance (STA) sources which can fund both operations and capital projects. Both sources require a local match. Based on MTC’s Cycle 5 fund estimate, a total of approximately $4.8 million is available for Alameda County for use in fiscal years 2018-19 and/or 2019-20.

Eligible projects must meet the goals of the Lifeline Transportation Program and meet the eligibility requirements of at least one of the available funding sources. Eligible applicants/direct funding recipients are limited to transit agencies, but an eligible transit agency may sponsor and apply for funding on behalf of an eligible sub-recipient, including cities and nonprofit organizations.

Application Materials

Project-specific Resolution of Local Support (Due May 25, 2018)

Additional Resources

Staff contacts:

Andrea Gomez, 510.208.7456 agomez@alamedactc.org
Jacki Taylor, 510.208.7413 jtaylor@alamedactc.org

State Funding Programs

Senate Bill 1: Road Repair and Accountability Act (SB 1): Senate Bill 1 (SB1), the RA&RAof 2017, is a state funding source for state and local roads, goods movement, public transit, and active transportation programs.

State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP): The State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) is a multi-year capital improvement program of transportation projects on and off the State Highway System, funded with revenues from the State Highway Account and other funding sources.

Senate Bill 1: Road Repair and Accountability Act

In April 2017, Governor Jerry Brown signed into law Senate Bill 1 (SB 1), the Road Repair and Accountability Act of 2017. This landmark funding program increased the gas tax, diesel tax and vehicle registration fees to invest approximately $5.4 billion annually in state and local roads, goods movement, public transit and active transportation programs. Here in the County of Alameda, SB 1 alone will generate over $480 million for road repairs and maintenance over the next 10 years, providing funding to every city, the county and transit operators.

SB 1 provides funding for every community to rehabilitate, repair, and maintain local streets and roads, make critical, life-saving safety improvements, repair and replace aging bridges and culverts, reduce congestion and increase mobility options including for transit, bicycle and pedestrian facilities. The impact of funding for each city, the County and transit operators are shown in the fact sheets below.

SB 1 also supports projects currently funded by Measure BB – a measure approved overwhelmingly by Alameda County voters and is anticipated to generate over $8 billion for essential transportation improvements in every city and throughout the County. Measure BB has served as a down payment to attract regional, state and federal funds to deliver projects that support local jobs and the economy. The following projects could be funded with SB 1 funding, also summarized in this fact sheet.

 Examples of Projects that can leverage SB 1 Funding

Funding Safeguards

Proposition 69, which was approved by voters in June 2018, ensures that all SB 1 funding is secured for transportation and cannot be used for other purposes. SB 1 establishes an independent Inspector General appointed by the Governor to oversee programs to ensure all funds are spent as promised and to report annually.

Proposition 6: Puts Project Funding at Risk

A measure to repeal SB 1 through a constitutional amendment will be on the November 2018 ballot as Proposition 6. If successful, this proposition will:

  • Eliminate SB 1 funding sources and reduce transportation funding in the cities, Alameda County and throughout the state
  • Require legislation to submit any measure enacting specified taxes or fees on gas or diesel fuel, or on the privilege to operate a vehicle on public highways, to the electorate for approval
  • Potentially lower future transportation tax revenues

Alameda CTC took a unanimous oppose position on Proposition 6 at its July 2018 Commission meeting.

SB 1 Transportation Funding Education

Senate Bill 1 (SB 1) Brochure

(SB 1 brochure revised July 31, 2018.)

SB 1-Prop 6 County and City Fact Sheets

 
  • All County and cities fact sheets roll-up.
  •  

    SB 1 Transit Fact Sheets

    SB 1-Prop 6 PowerPoint Presentation (including notes)

     

    Talking Points: SB 1-Prop 6

    Social Media Tools

    The State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) is a multi-year capital improvement program of transportation projects on and off the State Highway System, funded with revenues from the State Highway Account and other funding sources. The STIP is composed of two sub-elements: 75 percent of STIP funds go toward the Regional Transportation Improvement Program (RTIP) and 25 percent go to the Interregional Transportation Improvement Program (ITIP).

    As the Regional Transportation Planning Agency for the nine-county Bay Area, the Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC) is responsible for developing the regional priorities and fund estimate for the RTIP. Each STIP cycle, the Alameda CTC adopts and forwards a county program of RTIP projects to MTC. MTC then approves the region’s RTIP and submits it to the California Transportation Commission for inclusion in the STIP. The California Department of Transportation is responsible for developing the ITIP.

    Staff contact: Vivek Bhat, 510.208.7430, vbhat@alamedactc.org

    Federal Funding Programs

    One Bay Area Grant (OBAG) Program: (Surface Transportation Program/Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (STP/CMAQ)) The Federal One Bay Area Grant (OBAG) funding is intended to support Alameda CTC’s Sustainable Communities Strategy by linking transportation dollars to land-use decisions and targeting transportation investments to support priority development areas (PDAs).

    The Federal One Bay Area Grant (OBAG) funding is intended to support Alameda CTC’s Sustainable Communities Strategy by linking transportation dollars to land-use decisions and targeting transportation investments to support priority development areas (PDAs). The program was created by the Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC), the Regional Transportation Planning Agency for the nine-county Bay Area, and is funded with the federal Surface Transportation Program and Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality funding sources.

    The OBAG program supports California’s climate law, Senate Bill 375, which requires a Sustainable Communities Strategy to integrate land use and transportation to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Per MTC’s OBAG program requirements, 70 percent of the funds must be used toward transportation projects within PDAs.

    Alameda CTC is responsible for selecting and programming the Alameda County share of OBAG funds. The Cycle 1 OBAG program was adopted in May 2013. The Alameda County Cycle 2 OBAG program was adopted as part of the 2018 CIP, April 27, 2017.

    REFERENCE MATERIALS:

    Staff contact: Vivek Bhat, 510.208.7430, vbhat@alamedactc.org